Artist Spotlight / Interview

FARMFest Artist Spotlight #4: Dubloadz + Exclusive Interview!!

1267944_626694907352212_903315674_o With FARMFest now in the near-sight, we’re getting more and more excited with each passing day. The festival promises for an amazing weekend no matter what type of music fan you are; and for those interested in genres all across the spectrum, its easily one of the most premier festivals on the East coast. From jamtronica, to rock, to funky glitch-hop, and of course heavy bass, FARMFest has everything for everyone. The lineup is impressive to say the least, gathering artists from across the country and globe alike, each bringing their own inspirations and styles to the table.

For bass heads attending FARMFest, one artist we’re truly excited about, and one that you should also be truly excited about, is Dubloadz. The New Jersey producer has been making strides with his music, redefining the heavy bass sound, and constantly breathing fresh air into the genre. Having collaborated with plenty of other greatly talented producers, its not difficult to see that Dubloadz is an artist worth keeping an eye on, not only in 2014, but for future years to come. I was lucky enough to sit down with the up and coming producer to talk about his roots, his future plans, his presence at FARMFest, forthcoming collaborations and releases, and more. If you aren’t already familiar with the name Dubloadz, then be prepared to be.

See our past FARMFest artist spotlights here:

Artist Spotlight #1: Phutureprimitive

Artist Spotlight #2: Moon Hooch

Artist Spotlight #3: Random Rab

Dubloadz Soundcloud // Facebook

FarmFest 2014 – Website // Event Page // Facebook

Funkadelphia: Where are you originally from, and where are you based out of now?
Dubloadz: I’ve lived in Jersey my whole life, middle of nowhere in the woods. But my career really got its start in Knoxville oddly enough. Still based out of Jersey at the moment, but it’s only a matter of time before I move somewhere that’s more surrounded by art and music.

 

Funkadelphia: Were you always an electronic music fan? Or what were you listening to before and when did you make the transition to electronic music?
Dubloadz: I actually started as a metal head and still listen to it all the time. I used to play in a metal “project” where I wrote recorded and produced all the tracks, then had my friend do the vocals. I was also a drum & bass head before I got into dubstep. Before high school I listened to a ton of Counterstrike, Limewax, Panacea crossbreed kind of stuff. When I was a freshman in college I heard dubstep and that was it. It was like the genre I always imagined and I fell in love.

Funkadelphia: You’ve mentioned a few, but who are some other artists, electronic or otherwise, that you feel have brought inspiration to your music?
Dubloadz: I’m influenced by a lot of stuff even outside of music. Movies and videos that I think would make good themes in my music, physical art that gives me ideas for music that would go with it, as weird as that might sound. And of course I get inspired by how badly I want to do this with my life. But the dubstep artists that influenced my production the most were 50 carrot and Coffi, 16bit, Lost, Getter. There’s a lot to name.

Funkadelphia: Dubstep, and bass music in general has gone in a lot of different directions over the past few years. The really heavy, dark dub stuff seems to be making a rise amongst up and coming and more underground artists recently. Do you have a particular style of dubstep that you’re trying to approach when making your music?
Dubloadz: For now, I try to keep the stuff I’m producing on some kind of consistent style, mainly between really wonky or weird stuff and really heavy stuff. But I don’t want to isolate myself specifically to dark or heavy dubstep. I plan to explore producing a lot of other genres in the future but for now I’m just trying to build my fanbase without throwing a million different styles at them.    

Funkadelphia: Electronic music in general seems to be a constant target for criticism in its lack of versatility. What are you doing to maintain originality in your music?
Dubloadz: It’s getting harder and harder to push the boundaries of electronic music but it’s far from losing versatility. The spectrum you can cover with just your DAW of choice and massive is huge. Then add in all the different alternate programs, VSTs, effects and samples you can use and the spectrum becomes limitless. I just try to keep every track I put out fresh and different while still keeping my specific sound and style of production intact. The artists that think electronic music is lacking versatility simply aren’t pushing their limits enough.

Funkadelphia: You’ve worked with a lot of other great producers in the past. Are there any artists, namely, that you would be interested in working with in the future? Or anyone that you’re talking with now that we might expect to see collabs from?
Dubloadz:
 People would be mindblown at the ammount of collabs I’ve worked on that just never made the cut. JPhelpz, Rekoil, Detzky, several with Coffi, several others with Midnight Tyrannosaurus and a whole bunch more just ended up getting scrapped. But I know myself and those artists will end up getting stuff done in the future. Right now I’ve got a new one with Trollphace wrapped up, a new one with Wobad, and one with London Nebel finished as well. Some of the bigger ones are still in the works. There’s one with myself and 12th Planet and another with myself, 12th Planet and Protohype. As for artists I’d like to collab with, Eptic is the first that comes to mind. 50 Carrot and Bukez as well. I’ll see if we can make any of those happen down the road. Collaborating is one of the best parts of the music and art scene in my opinion.

Funkadelphia: Are there any upcoming Dubloadz releases we should be getting excited about?
Dubloadz: I have an EP titled “The Jugular EP” coming out on SMOG next month. Right now they’re shooting for the second or third week and working on the art. I also have another tune coming out on Cotti’s label “Sumtingnew” but I’m not sure of a release date for that one yet. There’s some other big things down the road as well but they’re too far away for me to know whether or not they’re set in stone.

Funkadelphia: Alright, well I greatly appreciate your time. Can’t wait for your set at FARMFest in just a few weeks! Any last words you’d like to leave your fans and listeners, as well as our readers, with?
Dubloadz: Just that people need to really come together and channel their positive energy and make the things they want in life happen. I’m afraid that a lot of people who could be doing great things don’t actually believe the big picture is real or have enough motivation to really make it happen. It takes a lot of time and hard work in all aspects. Look at all the top dogs right now. They’ve been in the game for a decade or so and never dropped out when shit got rough. It’s one thing to make great music, but you have to have the set of balls to make moves with it. Take chances go on adventures meet people get your music to the right ears. Become a worldly centered person. Ignore the bullsh*t in social networking and the people who are going to badmouth you and attend to the people who are helping. If you’re not happy with the music you make look up more tutorials, take a class, etc. People don’t realize how much control they have over their own lives. People want to settle for the mediocre job they have instead of looking for a new one, or the girl they’re “in love with” even though there are probably thousands of better fits for them, or their sub par music instead of focusing on improving. Make the things you want in your life a reality. It’s in no one’s hands except your own.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s